past

Marianne Vlaschits

A New Home

09. March 2018 - 21. April 2018

At the spot where the two white glowing lightsabers meet on the screen, the dark purple sky opens up to reveal a glittering universe.  The guardians of this magic portal are two frog-faced goddesses in pink raiment; swords drawn, they flank the wondrous gate like a pair of sphinges. To get sucked in is to find oneself in the midst of the fantastical cosmos of Marianne Vlaschits (*1983).

One aspect of the Austrian artist’s modus operandi involves using installations to take the narrative threads that run through her paintings and spin them further. In her solo show “A New Home” at Galerie Nathalie Halgand, she once again transformed the exhibition space into a brimming, atmospherically dense installation. The gallery windows were darkened and the walls were covered with an extraterrestrial desert nightscape. This mural creates a background for some dozen canvasses lit by individual spotlights. Immersed in this arrangement as if in a rocketship, visitors are sent plunging through an imagined deep space. But unlike the infinite depths of space, this artistic cosmos is densely populated. We see a gallery of ancestral portraits dedicated to the residents of multiple planets and galactic habitats: Vlaschits has covered her canvasses with polymorphic lifeforms, extraterrestrial landscapes, and visionary flying objects in an interplay of gradual progressions and pastose, extensively applied paint with powerful tones.

While visitors to Vlaschits’ past exhibitions already encountered space travellers, spaceships, and floating cities, in “A New Home” she has expanded her solar system even further. Androgynous creatures, oceanic proliferations, galactic holes – her images harbor speculations of multiple sexualities, future worlds and parallel universes ruled by powerful femininity. Her allusions are many, and readers of feminist science fiction from the last four decades will recognize several figures. Enthroned on a mountain rising up from an icy landscape covered in blue crystals beneath a pink sky is an androgynous figure in a white cape – a resident of the planet Gethen, perhaps, the scene of Ursula K. Le Guin’s 1969 novel “The Left Hand of Darkness”? Neither man nor woman, the creatures at home here are ambisexual. Once a month they go into “kemmer,” a phase of sexual activity during which their bodies take on either male or female characteristics. Marianne Vlaschits illustrates this moment on Gethen, a planet whose society is not based on a permanent dualism of the sexes.

Another work shows a grey-blue tentacle-creature tightly entangled with two anthropomorphic figures. It seems to have attached itself to their necks with its long arms. This scene was inspired by the visions of non-hierarchical alien sex described by Octavia E. Butler in her novel trilogy „Lilith’s Brood“ (1987-89). Butler develops an alternative concept to binary reproduction mechanisms in a post-apocalyptic age in which human relationships have expanded to include liaisons with migrating Oankali aliens and reproduction has become a question of genetic exchange:

„She jumped when Nikanj touched her with the tip of a sensory arm. She stared at it for a moment longer wondering how she had lost her horror of such a being. Then she lay down, perversely eager for what it could give her. She positioned herself against it, and was not content until she felt the deceptively light touch of the sensory hand and felt the ooloi body tremble against her.”

In taking up this story’s motifs, “A New Home” becomes a strategic site for the representation of love, sex and forms of life outside patriarchal, heteronormative worlds of imagination.

The motifs of feminist space utopia and of journeying through strange galaxies also contain concrete references to the economic, social and political present and to the history of space travel. In the early 1970s, then-Nasa chief James C. Fletcher proclaimed: “We earthlings should regard the solar system as our domain. We should go out and stake our claim – because we are the only ones here.”

Today, in times of resource scarcity, global warming and impending nuclear conflict, this claim is being boldly asserted once again – in the form, however, of a private-sector undertaking driven primarily by US tech billionaires from the new space industry, not least – as they claim – in order to secure the survival of mankind against home-made planetary collapse. At present, however, the ticket price for a Mars mission is around 10 billion dollars. SpaceX announced that, in order to make the trip to the red planet “affordable for everyone,” it would get the price down to $200,000 – still beyond the great majority of the world’s population. This is thus still the narrative of a privileged elite preparing its own flight to space, to conquer foreign planets and dig up metals on distant asteroids.

On the basis of intensive research, Marianne Vlaschits’ latest works also deal with these neo-colonial fantasies of space conquest by asking probing questions and developing counter-narratives. Which of our visions of the future of humankind in space and on earth are connected to space travel, especially the privately financed variety? What are the military, neoliberal and neo-colonial interests that are inscribed in these projects? Oh, and by the way: Who will even be able to afford to be considered a human being when it comes to exclusive rescue scenarios?

For what is considered “human” is often defined in white male SF narratives from an androcentric perspective and based on “othering,” a strategy of differentiation with the goal of asserting “normality” and thus the predominance of one’s own position. Le Guin explains this in her 1975 essay “American SF and the Other”:

„Male elitism has run rampant in SF. But is it only male elitism? Isn’t the „subjection of women“ in SF merely a symptom of a whole which is authoritarian, power-worshiping, and intensely parochial? The question involved here is the question of The Other — the being who is different from yourself.”

These “others” are the ones who are feared, whose participation is restricted and whose power is suppressed, whether as sexualized, racialized, naturalized, or technological others. Unfortunately, the sci-fi genre is still used all too often today as an instrument for reproducing normative, xenophobic messages and patriarchal, sexist stereotypes. At the same time, it offers a boundless space for speculating on other forms of coexistence, love, sexuality, political organization and possibilities for resistance and reappropriation of history and the future.

Marianne Vlaschits’ work shows this. She is developing a form of artistic expression that points to the resistant potential of the imagination. The philosopher and biologist Donna Haraway describes the active and responsible shaping of this process as a collaborative string game: „it matters what knots knot knots, what thoughts think thoughts, what ties tie ties. It matters what stories make worlds, what worlds make stories.“

Taking up and further developing this string game is one way to interfere with the stories and practices of the New-Space-Sci-Fi-Valley Boys’ Club. For what it lacks are the various voices of the unwanted “others”: queer and feminist perspectives and critical, hard-charging objections. In this sense, the exhibition “A New Home” is, to quote Le Guin once again, an „exercise of imagination,” and one “[that] is dangerous to those who profit from the way things are because it has the power to show that the way things are is not permanent, not universal, not necessary.”

Text by Nada Schroer

About Marianne Vlaschits

Marianne Vlaschits (*1983, Vienna) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. Most recent exhibitions include „Queer Encounters – Vienna Trans L. A.“, (group exhibition), CALARTS, Los Angeles; „Promises of Monsters“, Kunstverein Hildesheim, Hildesheim, (2017); „Venus City“, Kevin Space, Vienna; „A disturbance traveling through a medium“, Duve Gallery Berlin, (2016); „Welcome to the Jungle“, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; „Panama“, One Work Gallery, Vienna (2015);  „Pas de Deux“ (group exhibition), Cairo (2014); „Praxis der Liebe“ (group exhibition), Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg, 2013. Marianne Vlaschits lives and works in Vienna.

Dort, wo sich die beiden weiß leuchtenden Lichtschwerter auf der Leinwand berühren, öffnet sich der dunkelviolette Himmel zu einem Tor, das den Blick auf ein funkelndes Universum freigibt. Hüterinnen dieser magischen Pforte sind zwei froschgesichtige Göttinnen in rosaroten Gewändern, die die verheißungsvolle Öffnung mit ihren Schwertern wie zwei Sphingen flankieren. Wer sich hineinsaugen lässt, befindet sich mitten im fantastischen Kosmos von Marianne Vlaschits (*1983).

Zu Vorgehensweise der österreichischen Künstlerin gehört es, die narrativen Fäden ihres malerischen Werks installativ weiterzuspinnen. Auch für ihre Einzelausstellung „A New Home“ in der Galerie Nathalie Halgand hat sie die Ausstellungsräume in eine atmosphärisch dichte, raumgreifende Installation verwandelt. Dafür wurden die Galeriefenster abgedunkelt und die Wände mit einer extraterrestrischen Wüstenlandschaft bei Nacht überzogen. Die Wandmalerei schafft den Hintergrund für etwa ein Dutzend Leinwände, auf die einzelne Spots gerichtet sind. Das immersive Arrangement umgibt die Besucher*innen wie ein Raumschiff und schickt sie auf die Reise durch einen imaginären deep space. Doch im Gegensatz zu den unendlichen Weiten ist der künstlerische Kosmos dicht bevölkert. Zu sehen ist eine Ahnengalerie, die den multiplanetaren Bewohner*innen in ihren galaktischen Lebensräume gewidmet ist: Polymorphe Lebewesen, extraterrestrische Landschaften und visionäre Flugobjekte hat Vlaschits in einem Wechselspiel aus sanften Verläufen und pastosem, flächigem Farbauftrag mit kräftigen Tönen auf die Leinwand gebracht.

Traf man in vergangenen Ausstellungen bereits auf Weltraumfahrerinnen und schwebende Städte, lässt die Künstlerin ihr Sonnensystem in „A New Home“ weiter expandieren. Androgyne Geschöpfe, ozeanische Wucherungen, galaktische Löcher – in ihren Bildern finden sich Spekulationen auf multiple Geschlechtlichkeit, zukünftige Welten und Paralleluniversen, die von kraftvoller Weiblichkeit bestimmt werden. Die Referenzen sind mannigfaltig und Leser*innen feministischer Science Fiction-Literatur der letzten vier Jahrzehnte werden einige Figuren wiedererkennen. Da ist zum Beispiel die Abbildung eines androgynen Wesens vom Planeten Gethen, auf dem sich die Handlung der 1969 erschienenen Erzählung „The Left Hand of Darkness“ von der feministischen Sci Fi-Autorin Ursula K. Le Guin abspielt.

Eine andere Arbeit zeigt ein graublaues Tentakel-Wesen, das eng umschlungen mit zwei anthropomorphen Figuren dargestellt ist. Inspiration für diese Szene boten Visionen nicht-hierarchischen Alien-Sexes, den die Autorin Octavia E. Butler in der Romantrilogie “Lilith’s brood” (1987-89) beschreibt. Vlaschits greift diese Geschichte motivisch auf. „A New Home“ wird so zu einem strategischen Ort für die Repräsentation von Liebe, Sex und Lebensformen außerhalb patriarchalischer, heteronormativer Vorstellungswelten.

In den Motiven der feministischen Weltraumutopie und der Reise durch den fremde Galaxien finden sich jedoch auch konkrete Bezüge zur ökonomischen und gesellschaftlichen Gegenwart und zur Geschichte der Raumfahrt. Anfang der 70er-Jahre proklamierte der damalige Nasa-Chef James C. Fletcher: „Wir Erdlinge sollten das Sonnensystem als unsere Domäne ansehen. Wir sollten hinausgehen und unseren Claim abstecken – denn wir sind die einzigen, die es hier gibt.“

Heute, in Zeiten von Ressourcenknappheit, Erderwärmung und drohenden nuklearen Konflikten, ist dieser Claim wieder lautstark zu hören. Es handelt sich jedoch um ein privatwirtschaftliches Unterfangen, das vor allem von US-amerikanischen High-Tech-Milliardären der New Space-Industrie vorangetrieben wird, nicht zuletzt – so die Behauptung – um das Überleben der Menschheit gegen den hausgemachten planetarischen Kollaps zu sichern. Derzeit liegt der Ticketpreis für eine Marsmission jedoch bei rund 10 Milliarden Dollar. SpaceX hatte angekündigt, den Preis auf 200.000 Dollar zu drücken, um den Trip zum roten Planeten, „für jeden erschwinglich zu machen“

– für den Großteil der Weltbevölkerung ist dies wohl immer noch unbezahlbar. Es handelt sich also bis dato um das Narrativ einer privilegierten Elite, die ihre eigene Flucht ins All vorbereitet, um fremde Planeten zu erobern und auf fernen Astroiden nach Metallen zu schürfen.

Ausgehend von einer intensive Recherche setzt sich Marianne Vlaschits in ihren neusten Arbeiten auch mit diesen neokolonialen Phantasien der Weltraumeroberung auseinander, stellt Fragen und entwickelt Gegennarrative. Welche Vorstellungen von der Zukunft der Menschheit im Weltraum und auf Erden sind mit der Raumfahrt, besonders der privat finanzierten, verbunden? Welche militärischen, neoliberalen und neokolonialen Interessen sind diesen Vorhaben eingeschrieben? Und ganz nebenbei: Wer kann es sich vor dem Horizont exklusiver Rettungsszenarien überhaupt leisten, als Mensch zu gelten?

Denn was als ‚menschlich‘ gilt, wird in weißen, männlichen SF-Erzählungen häufig aus einer androzentrischen Perspektive heraus definiert und beruht dem ‚Othering‘, eine Abgrenzungsstrategie, um die ‚Normalität‘ und damit die Vorherrschaft der eigenen Position zu behaupten.  Dies legt Le Guin in ihrem 1975 erschienen Essay „American SF and the Other“ dar:

„Male elitism has run rampant in SF. But is it only male elitism? Isn’t the „subjection of women“ in SF merely a symptom of a whole which is authoritarian, power-worshiping, and intensely parochial? The question involved here is the question of The Other —the being who is different from yourself.”

Diese ‚Anderen‘ sind es dann auch, die gefürchtet werden, deren Teilhabe eingegrenzt und deren Macht bekämpft wird. Leider wird das Sci Fi-Genre auch heute noch viel zu häufig als Instrument der Reproduktion von normativen, sexistischen und xenophoben Botschaften und Stereotype gebraucht. Wo es doch gleichzeitig grenzenlosen Raum für die Spekulation auf andere Formen des Liebens, der Sexualität, der politischen Organisation und Möglichkeiten der Wiederaneignung von Geschichte und Zukunft bietet.

Dies zeigen die Arbeiten von Marianne Vlaschits. Sie entwickelt einen künstlerischen Ausdruck, der auf das widerständige Potential der Imagination verweist. Diesen Prozess aktiv und verantwortungsbewusst mitzugestalten, beschreibt die Philosophin und Biologin Donna Haraway als kollaboratives Fadenspiel: „it matters what knots knot knots, what thoughts think thoughts, what ties tie ties. It matters what stories make worlds, what worlds make stories.“

Das Fadenspiel aufzunehmen und  weiterzuspinnen, stellt eine Möglichkeit dar, um sich in die Erzählungen und Praktiken des New Space-Sci Fi-Valley-Boysclubs einzumischen. Denn was fehlt, sind die diversen Stimmen der unerwünschten ‚Anderen‘, kritische und queer-feministische Perspektiven. In diesem Sinne kann die Ausstellung „A New Home“, um noch einmal Le Guins Worte zu zitieren, als “exercise of imagination” bezeichnet werden, „[that] is dangerous to those who profit from the way things are because it has the power to show that the way things are is not permanent, not universal, not necessary.”

Text: Nada Schroer

Marianne Vlaschits (*1983, Wien) studierte an der Akademie der bildenden Künste in Wien. Zu ihren jüngsten Ausstellungen gehören „Queer Encounters – Vienna Trans L. A.“, CALARTS, Los Angeles; „Promises of Monsters“, Kunstverein Hildesheim, Hildesheim, (2017); „Venus City“, Kevin Space, Wien; „A disturbance traveling through a medium“, Duve Gallery, Berlin (2016); „Welcome to the Jungle“, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; „Panama“, One Work Gallery, Wien(2015);  „Pas de Deux“ (Gruppenausstellung), Kairo (2014); „Praxis der Liebe“ (Gruppenausstellung), Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg, (2013). Marianne Vlaschits lebt und arbeitet in Wien.

Marianne Vlaschits (*1983, Vienna) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. Most recent exhibitions include „Queer Encounters – Vienna Trans L. A.“, (group exhibition), CALARTS, Los Angeles; „Promises of Monsters“, Kunstverein Hildesheim, Hildesheim, (2017); „Venus City“, Kevin Space, Vienna; „A disturbance traveling through a medium“, Duve Gallery Berlin, (2016); „Welcome to the Jungle“, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; „Panama“, One Work Gallery, Vienna (2015);  „Pas de Deux“ (group exhibition), Cairo (2014); „Praxis der Liebe“ (group exhibition), Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg, 2013. Marianne Vlaschits lives and works in Vienna.